Bread for Acceptance

“It was about this time that my Father planned and founded a Club (that) met every Thursday evening, I think at the house of Abigail Jones, a coloured cook famous at that day…Most of the prominent men of ability and character in New York belonged to the club, which also through its members, invited strangers…

Dainty Bread

“The new woman, in the sense of the best woman, the flower of all the womanhood of past ages, has come to stay — if civilization is to endure. The sufferings of the past have but strengthened her, maternity has deepened her, education is broadening her — and she now knows that she must perfect…

Yuppie Bread

The word foodie was coined in 1980 by New York Times critic Gael Greene. It described a sensibility that was just taking hold among youngish, well-to-do New Yorkers who had developed an intense new relationship with food and restaurants, along with a taste for luxe ingredients—crème fraiche, sun-dried tomatoes, black walnuts—on an everyday basis. Upper-middle…

Purist Bread

The purist tradition is reactive. It’s a slightly highbrow, civilizing response to the enthusiasm American cooks, ably assisted by Madison Avenue, developed for factory-processed foods by the mid-twentieth century. Before canned vegetables and canned soup, cake mix and pudding mix and Cool Whip came to define normal, down-to-earth food style for virtually all Americans, cooking…